We ask 6 influencers: ‘How has your relationship with food changed as you’ve gotten older?’

'I love a glass of wine and some fries every now and then'

By Jess Arrowsmith • 4 weeks ago • HEALTH, STYLE


Ahead of the Peaches Pilates #LOVEYOURPEACH event, founder Tori Clapham caught up with the event’s panellists – along with a couple of the brand’s most loved clients – to talk about their own journeys with food and diet culture. 

‘Next Saturday, we’ll be delving into the intricacies of diet culture, and discussing the effect our mental health has on the habits we form,’ Tori says.

Adding: ‘Our panel will be arming us with tools we can use to cut the GUILT AND the BULLSHIT from our psyche. As well as finding the best ways to live a happy, healthy life when it comes to adequately nourishing our bodies. Until then – here’s my mini-view with some of the most influential women we see on our insta feeds:’



Lyndi Cohen – Best-selling author of The Nude Nutritionist, TV Dietitian, Founder of the Back to Basics lifestyle

Question: How has your relationship with food changed as you’ve gotten older?

Lyndi: Growing up, I was told I needed to limit ‘bad’ food and eat less to be worth more. As a result, I become obsessed with food. Measuring it, weighing it, counting it and avoiding it which to bingeing on food. There was no balance for me and food was a source of so much guilt, shame and sadness for me. Nowadays, I have a deeply healthy relationship with food. And it makes me wonder why it isn’t taught in schools and at work. Food should never make us feel shame or guilt and we all deserve to be healthy, without it controlling our lives. 

Question: What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to diet culture?

Answer: The problem with diet culture is that it’s everywhere, and so defines how health is still being taught. We have come to think that a healthy body must look good in a swimsuit. The truth is that for most people to look like the front cover of a fitness magazine, they would need to do incredibly unhealthy things to get that body. There is nothing healthy about avoiding whole food groups and overexercise and obsessing about food. We need to redefine what health looks like in order for us to be truly healthy. It’s time to see more realistic images of what a healthy, balanced body really looks like if we want real health. 


Leigh Campbell: Exec Editor at Mamamia.

Host of Australia’s biggest beauty podcast, You Beauty, and This Glorious Mess Little Kids and mother

Question: How has your relationship with food changed as you’ve gotten older?

Leigh: I’ve never had a terrible relationship with food. Sure, I dieted in my 20s but never really had the willpower to stick to anything. In my 30s I’ve definitely stopped looking at food types as ‘good’ or ‘bad’, and I think I’ve learnt to indulge myself (I love junk food) in a balanced way that works for me without impacting my health. 

Question: What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to diet culture?

Leigh:  ‘Experts’ on the internet using confirmation bias to pass off their beliefs as facts. It’s resulting in people cutting out whole food groups or buying into fad trends (hello, celery drink) unnecessarily and could potentially lead to disordered eating or a worsened relationship with food and their body.



Eleanor Pendleton – Founder and Editor in Chief, Gritty Pretty

Question: How has your relationship with food changed as you’ve gotten older?

Eleanor: As I’ve grown older, I’ve become so much more connected with my body. In my teens and 20s, I had an extremely fast metabolism (mostly due to Asian genetics) and I was able to eat whatever I wanted with little exercise required to keep trim. Now, in my 30s, I’ve learned how much I love eating healthy foods and nourishing my body. I don’t believe in depriving myself either so I love a glass of wine and some fries every now and then but combined with regular exercise, I don’t ever make myself to feel guilty. I believe treating my body to be healthy and me to be happy is all about balance.

Question: What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to diet culture?

Eleanor: Unsolicited advice is one of my greatest pet peeves. Our bodies are personal and coming to a place where we, especially as women, are not just content with our bodies but proud of them isn’t easy with the messages and images society throws at us from a very young age. That being said, I’ve developed a strong constitution to not care what others think of my body. I like my body, I eat what I want and I exercise when I can.

Due to my Filipino heritage, I’m the first to admit I am a naturally slim and petite woman but this has also come with its barrage of comments over the years. At the end of the day, I’m at my happiest when I’m looking after myself the best I can.



Tash Oakley – CEO of @MondaySwimwear, Co-creator @ABikiniaDay

Question: How has your relationship with food changed as you’ve gotten older?

Tash: I have always craved a healthy balanced diet, but I’ve realized with age how much what you put in your body affects every part of your life, from your mental health and physical appearance to your long term health and self-esteem. I am now especially particular about eating natural, non-processed foods and having a healthy balanced diet. 

Question: What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to diet culture?

Tash: That people are not more open-minded when it comes to incorporating more plant-based meals into their diet. My advice to people is to at least educate yourself on the matter – because it affects you and your future in ways you can’t even imagine – and that you shouldn’t feel comfortable commenting on something you haven’t properly researched.



Katie Lolas – Influencer, Creator of @MealPrepMVP & @Balance.Bare

Question: How has your relationship with food changed as you’ve gotten older?

Katie: I’ve become more relaxed about what I eat and how I eat, but I’ve also become more mindful of what I want to put into my body. As a result, I no longer define my health or my worth by a number on the scale, I don’t count calories, and I don’t allow my weight or dress size to dictate how I feel about myself and I eat to enjoy. I’m honestly the heaviest I’ve been in my life, but I’m proud of my achievements, secure with my appearance and I feel comfortable and confident in my own skin – all thanks to ditching the sales, any and all crash-course diets, and especially calorie counting. 

Question: What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to diet culture?

Katie: That exercise has become a tool to try and achieve an often unattainable body type rather than something that is empowering. Additionally that companies and influencers are trying to sell a ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution to our health and wellness concerns. As much as people don’t want to hear this, there’s never going to be a miracle product or program that’s going to solve our issues. I believe we should be encouraging people to invest time to create bespoke solutions and receive advice from accredited professionals like dieticians and exercise physiologists rather than companies who are clearly trying to capitalise on our insecurities. 


Monique Bowie – Model and mother

Question: How has your relationship with food changed as you’ve gotten older?

Mon: My relationship with food has 100% changed as I’ve gotten older. When I was younger, I ate whatever I wanted, loved savoury and sweet treats and drank soft drink. Now, I wouldn’t be able to even have a sip of soft drink – way too sweet!! I have become more interested in what goes into my body, and how that affects it on a cellular level. I’ve learnt that food is fuel for your body – so it’s important to eat the right things!

Question: What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to diet culture?

Mon: In general, I don’t like the word diet – or when someone says they are on a diet. I feel if you’re eating whole healthy foods, and cutting out preservatives and refined foods – you are on the right track. There’s no need for labels – make it a lifestyle!



Wanna join in on the event? There’s still a handful of tickets left – click here to secure yours.



 

 

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